Gazebos, Awnings, and Canopies
Gazebos, Awnings, and Canopies

L'Italia_In_Bocca_Pizza_Restaurant,_Bercy_-_Paris

 

It’s summertime, I’ve got my hat on backwards, and it’s time to have a get-together under a gazebo. If you live in a warm and sunny place like South Florida, you know to search for all of the shade you can get. When it’s hot, it gets really hot—having a gazebo, an awning, or a canopy attached to your property can give you a space to enjoy the outdoors in the summer and springtime. If you’ve ever been interested, here’s the rundown on the different options you have for shaded settings on your property.

 

What’s the difference between a gazebo, awning, and a canopy? A gazebo is most like a house—”a roofed structure that offers an open view of the surrounding area, typically used for relaxation or entertainment.” An awning is most like a shade—”a sheet of canvas or other material stretched on a frame and used to keep the sun or rain off a storefront, window, doorway, or deck.” A canopy is perhaps the most vague, and could technically describe either a gazebo or awning, but is usually just a simpler version of the two—”a rooflike projection or shelter.”

 

What are the benefits of having a gazebo, awning, or canopy? They’re not just for summer—with outdoor structures like these, you can get year-long protection from the elements, whether it be rain or snow or sun. They make great sites for get togethers and hosting guests.  Set up a few outdoor seats (wicker furniture, lawn chairs, etc.) and chill in the shade with a glass of lemonade in hand.

 

How can you get one? The question is usually build or buy. While some fixtures like awnings are best bought—think of electronic retractable ones—you can easily DIY your own canopy or gazebo, with varying levels of fanciness and decor depending on your affinity for construction.  If you’re renting property, remember to speak with your landlord about any additions to the property before you make any decisions or purchases.